Why So Many Dead Bodies?

I’ve been sick for a few days with a nasty head cold.  Sitting in bed with the dogs and my iPad for company, I’ve been thinking about a question readers sometimes ask me: why do so many people die in your books?

In truth, not that many people die in my books, but there are definitely a few, and I suppose for romance the number is a bit surprising. The reasons for their deaths are twofold: 1. death can be a useful literary device; and 2. people died in Victorian times. A lot of people.

Although the mortality rate fell during the course of the Victorian era (deaths per 1,000 people per year in England and Wales fell from 21.9 from 1848–54 to 17 in 1901, compared to just over 9 in 2015), sickness and death were regular visitors to Victorian communities, and overall, mortality rates were higher for women than men.  The most common cause of death: tuberculosis, also known as consumption, which caused about 25% of all deaths during this time period. Other common diseases were cholera, influenza, smallpox, typhus, typhoid (the disease thought to have killed Prince Albert), scarlet fever, and syphilis.

In 1858, raw sewage flowed in the Thames, the smell so intolerable it was feared the stench alone would kill Members of Parliament working in their chambers alongside the river. London and other cities, largely because of these conditions, were far less healthful than the country, and the poor were impacted in greater numbers than the middle and upper classes.

 

Although vaccination for smallpox became available in the 18th century, there were few treatments available for any of these diseases until the discovery and widespread use of antibiotics in the 20th century. Cholera, a waterborne disease, killed over 53,000 in 1849. Scarlet fever killed more than 20,000 in 1840. Those who sickened but did not die in a given outbreak were left weakened and susceptible to being carried off by the next illness, which often occurred at nearly the same time as the first outbreak.

 

It is hard now to comprehend the rates at which people died in the Victorian era. My cold is making me miserable but it’s unlikely to carry me off, and even if I do get very sick, two of the best hospitals in the country are less than five miles away. The average Victorian, no matter what class, could not say the same.

I’ve touched on the Victorian obsession with death in a previous post, and when you see the high mortality rates of the period, it’s slightly more understandable. Although I don’t think anything really justifies creepy post-mortem photography.

 

 

Sources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victorian_era#Mortality_rates
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/health/12158930/Biggest-annual-rise-in-deaths-for-almost-fifty-years-prompts-warnings-of-crisis-in-elderly-care.html
http://www.ehs.org.uk/press/different-death-rates-of-men-and-women-in-victorian-england
https://www.bl.uk/victorian-britain/articles/health-and-hygiene-in-the-19th-century
http://www.geoffsgenealogy.co.uk/other-articles/life-death-in-the-19th-century/
http://www.victorianweb.org/science/health/health10.html

Winter Blog Hop, Day 13 – Julie Jarnagin

author-photo-resized2It’s Day 13!

Today’s guest is USA Today bestselling author of sweet and inspirational romance, Julie Jarnagin. Are you looking for gift ideas for the readers in your life? Julie’s found some fun, unique items for any book lover! Hop over to her website to read all about them.

Free Kindle Cover Template. RomanceHere’s Julie’s latest release, Engaged by Friday:

Can a fake engagement lead to lasting love?

After her boyfriend dumps her instead of proposing, Mary Beth wants nothing to do with her ten-year high school reunion. Especially because if she shows up without a date, she’ll lose a bet with her high school nemesis.

Christian is too busy with his camping equipment startup to date—until his sister sets him up online. The chance connection could help his business—if he agrees to Mary Beth’s dramatic request that he pretend to be her fiancé. But when make-believe becomes something more, they must decide if this new love can last…

You can find Engaged by Friday at AmazonB&N, Kobo, and iBooks

Historical Book Blast Friday: Jana Richards

It’s Book Blast Friday! My guest today is fellow Wild Rose author Jana Richards. Her newest novella, Home Fires, is set during World War II. Welcome, Jana!

Home FiresHomeFires_6865_680
by Jana Richards

Anne Wakefield travels halfway around the world for love. But when she arrives in Canada from England at the end of World War Two, she discovers the handsome Canadian pilot she’d fallen in love with has married someone else. Heartbroken, she prepares to return to London, though she has nothing left there to return to. Her former fiancé’s mother makes a suggestion: marriage to her other son.

Badly wounded and scarred during the war, Erik Gustafson thinks he’s a poor substitute for his brother. Although he loves Anne almost from the first time he sees her, he cannot believe she would ever be able to love him as he is – especially as he might be after another operation on his bad leg.  Anne sees the beauty of his heart. The cold prairie winter may test her courage, but can she prove to Erik that her love for him is real?

 Excerpt:

She whirled around to glare at him, her eyes blazing. “No! I’m not a child! I don’t have to be mollycoddled and babysat. I spent six years in a war zone, hiding in bomb shelters, never having enough to eat. I worked in a hospital treating blitz victims with wounds so horrendous grown men would gag to look at them. I faced those horrors every day. Sometimes things were so bad I thought I couldn’t go on. But I did. Because I had to. And I’ll face things here, too. So don’t tell me to give up, because I won’t!”

Erik pushed himself out of his chair to face her, awed by her spirit and courage. She lifted her chin as if defying him to contradict her, her hands clenched at her sides. Her dark hair curled in wild abandon as it dried, framing her pale oval face like a halo. Her beauty and ferocity were magnificent.

“I think you’re the strongest woman I know.”

Her eyes widened in surprise, her hands unclenching. He caught the quiver of her chin as she fought to hold back tears.

“I made such a mess of things,” she whispered. “I’m sorry for all the fuss I caused everyone.”

Erik took a step toward her. “It’s not your fault. I shouldn’t have let you go alone in the dark.”

“You didn’t know I would stupidly walk out onto thin ice.” She shook her head. “I wanted to help. I wanted to be useful. I can’t stand feeling so bloody useless.”

“You’re not useless. You’re an amazing woman. Anders is a fool for letting you go.”

She stared at him, her eyes filling with tears. “Thank you.”

He opened his arms and she stepped into them, wrapping her arms around his waist, clinging to him. He held her tightly, inhaling the sweet, clean scent of her, never wanting to let her go.

“Don’t cry. Everything’s all right now.”

“I know I’m being stupid. Tears don’t solve anything,” she said against his chest. “But I was so cold, and so scared. I thought I was going to die.”

He tightened his hold and kissed her hair. “Don’t think about it anymore. You’re safe now.”

He heard her sigh, felt her relax against him. “Yes. I’m safe.”

She lifted her head to look into his face, her dark eyes shiny with tears, her lips slightly parted, and Erik stared at her mouth, wanting desperately to kiss her, to capture her sweetness. He slowly lowered his mouth to hers. To his surprise, she didn’t run off or turn away in revulsion. He was so close her breath mingled with his, her breathing shallow and erratic. His heart slammed against his chest, his body thrumming with need. For the first time in over three years, he felt alive.

HOME FIRES (e-version) is on sale for .99 cents at all major e-retailers between December 4 and 17, 2015.

Buy Home Fires at these retailers: The Wild Rose Press | All Romance Ebooks | Amazon | B & N | Bookstrand |Google Play | Kobo | iBooks | BAM

Jana RichardsJana Richards has tried her hand at many writing projects over the years, from magazine articles and short stories to full-length paranormal suspense and romantic comedy. She loves to create characters with a sense of humor, but also a serious side.  She believes there’s nothing more interesting then peeling back the layers of a character to see what makes them tick.

When not writing up a storm, working at her day job as an Office Administrator, or dealing with ever present mountains of laundry, Jana can be found on the local golf course pursuing her newest hobby.

Jana lives in Western Canada with her husband Warren, and a highly spoiled Pug/Terrier cross named Lou.

You can find out more about Jana and her books at these sites:

Website:  http://www.janarichards.com
Blog:  http://janarichards.blogspot.com
Facebook:  http://www.facebook.com/JanaRichardsAuthor
Twitter:  http://www.twitter.com/JanaRichards_
Amazon Author Page:  http://www.amazon.com/author/janarichards
Newsletter Signup: http://www.eepurl.com/m3UnT
Goodreads:  https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/2892274Jana_Richards
Google+ Profile:  https://plus.google.com/100820406211390323245

Author Interview: Lily Vega

Today’s guest is my good friend, Lily Vega. Lily writes *very* steamy paranormal & contemporary romance. Her latest, Devil in a Blue Dress, was released in May by Changeling Press. Welcome, Lily!

Tell us a bit about you. Where do you live, and how long have you been writing? I live in the Midwest. I’ve shuffled around several different states. I’ve been writing consistently for about 5 years.

LV_DevilBlueDress_largeWhat inspired you to write Devil in A Blue Dress? (I adore the cover!) I enjoy creating characters with a dark side. When I pitched the Devil May Care series, I didn’t know much more than the third installment would wrap up the series and either the hero or heroine would first appear in the second story. After book two, I had the heroine, heroes, and the theme – when you get what you want, things don’t always turn out like you’d expect. While I wrote the book, Ray’s struggle with addiction became key to the story.

What does your writing process look like? I write my short steamy books by the seat of my pants. At some point, I stop and determine which key events need to happen to complete the storyline and get to happy ever after. I note these and any other thoughts I want to incorporate into the story. I also keep a loose series bible to keep track of character attributes.

What do you do when you’re not writing? Drink.  Actually, I sometimes drink while I write. I love trying new craft beers, beer cocktails, and Guinness mixes (e.g. Guinness and Strongbow).

I’ve been known to drink wine while I write–keeps the creative juices flowing! What are you working on now? The Devil May Care series was planned as a trilogy. While the story was wrapped up at the end of book three, one of the minor characters, a fallen angel, needs his happy ever after, so I am working on his story, Falling for Her.

How many books do you have under the proverbial bed? Will they ever see the light of day? Too many to count! The triage process can be gut wrenching, but I plan to resurrect as many as possible. Going All In (1Night Stand), which was published in May by Decadent Publishing, was one of those under the bed books and I was thrilled with the end result. I’ve begun CPR on several other stories.

I tend to work through story ideas when I’m driving or in the shower, both of which are, of course, places I can’t write anything down. Do you have any strange writing habits? Post-It Notes. My workspace looks like an office supply store exploded. Cryptic notes like “Guy from set up = Guy #1” are scrawled on them. When the cats steal them, I usually find them under the couch or stuffed inside a shoe.

How do you come up with character names? First names just seem to come to me. Last names are harder. I’ve had to change names before too, Natalie was originally Anita, but the name was too similar to Arianna.

Name one thing about you that most people don’t know. I am crazy addicted to Plants versus Zombies. The main reason I bought an iPad was to play the game.

If you had a superpower, what would it be? I am in awe of exceptionally productive authors. My dream would be to consistently crank out large quantities of publishable prose. Heck, I’d be happy just to win NaNoWriMo.

Ah, wouldn’t that be nice? I won NaNoWriMo once–with a book that will probably never see the light of day–but never again. I do wish I could write faster! Other than “butt in chair,” what piece of advice would you give to an aspiring author? Share your knowledge with your writer friends. Find a great craft book, tool, or submission call? Let them know. They’ll reciprocate.

What book are you reading now? Open All Hours by Eden Royce. I’m a big fan of her Carnival Magic series. The heroine shifts into a black cat. How cool is that?

To find out more about Lily and her books, visit:
Website: http://lilyvega.com/
Facebook: Lily Vega
Twitter: @LV_Writer
Amazon Author Page: Lily Vega
Goodreads: LilyVegaWriter

Devil in a Blue Dress (Devil May Care #3) by Lily Vega

What’s a lust demon to do?

All of Xanthe’s heart’s desires are coming true. She’s a bridesmaid in her cousin’s wedding and in charge of the bachelorette party. Her boyfriend, True, is extra limber and up for sex whenever and wherever she wants. Everything is just too perfect — on the surface, anyway.

She suspects her sexual appetites are taking their toll on True. And the wedding festivities just aren’t as festive as she imagined. Enter Ray Perry, a bad boy with a dark past. He’s every bit as dominant as True is submissive, but an evil imp with a penchant for porn has a contract out on him.

When she discovers a vile plot to sabotage the wedding, Xanthe fights to save the day and her sexy men — one of whom holds her heart and the other her soul.

Excerpt:

True’s name suited his easygoing personality. Xanthe ran her gaze over his lithe body, starting with his long, shaggy, sun-highlighted blond hair to his sandals. Natalie referred to him as a crunchy-granola guy with a chocolate-candy heart. Xanthe couldn’t tell if it was a compliment or an insult.

He looked up then, seeming to feel Xanthe’s gaze, and his face lit up with a smile that made his light blue eyes sparkle. His warm touch ignited her libido. If she wasn’t hell bent on winning a damned bingo prize, she’d drag him under the table for a quick romp.

Available on Amazon.

 

Author Interview: Nina Croft

Apologies for my absence of late. June was crazy busy, and last week I was away for my anniversary–more on that in a future post!

My guest today is the very talented and prolific Nina Croft. Her latest book, The Spaniard’s Kiss, released this week. Welcome, Nina!

Portrait of writer Nicola Cleasby

Tell us a bit about you. Where do you live, and how long have you been writing?

My name is Nina Croft. I’m English but I live in southern Spain, in a beautiful area which lies between the Sierra Nevada Mountains and the Mediterranean Sea.

I first started writing a long time ago, when I was working as a volunteer in a remote village in Zambia on the banks of Lake Kariba. This was long before Kindles, and I ran out of books to read with alarming frequency (I had a book-a-day habit to feed!)  A tragedy of gargantuan proportions. My only recourse was to write my own and so I began. When I left Africa, I put writing aside for a while until I moved to Spain around ten years ago, when I started to seriously learn the craft, how to plot, write, edit. Now I’m totally hooked.

Wow! A tragedy indeed, but I’ll bet that was an amazing experience. What inspired you to write The Spaniard’s Kiss?

The opening scenes of my latest release, The Spaniard’s Kiss, take place in Spain, close to where I now live. It’s a remote area, far from any shops, and where the local shepherd still takes his goats out every day and the vineyards are ploughed by mules.  Some people love it, some people hate it. The reasons behind that fascinate me, and so I started The Spaniard’s Kiss. Rafe, the hero, has a grandfather who was a shepherd here, and he hates the place!

What does your writing process look like? 

I’m a total plotter, though I don’t stick to one method. I’ve tried both pantsing and plotting and everything in between but found that I’m happiest plotting out before I start writing, usually down to scene level. Two main reasons—the first is it gives me time to get to know my characters before I write. The other is that I like writing fast first drafts as I think the writing flows more naturally. I can only do that if I don’t have to keep stopping and deciding what happens next. It also means I can concentrate on character motivations and reactions to events while I’m writing, rather than on what those events actually are.

You have far more discipline than I do! What do you do when you’re not writing?

I don’t quite have a book-a-day habit anymore because I spend so much time writing, but I do still read a lot. Other things are: Horse riding, I have a beautiful mare called Gencianna. Walking, I have three dogs. Pig-grooming, I have a three-legged Vietnamese potbellied house pig. As you can see my spare time is pretty animal-orientated. Also this time of year, I swim and go to the beach when I can—I love the sea.

Sounds very bucolic. 🙂 What are you working on now?

I’m currently working on the first draft of a book for Entangled Publishing’s Brazen line—hot contemporary romance. It’s called, Her Fantasy Husband, and it’s book 2 in a new series, Things To Do Before You Die. I’m also working on edits for the first book, His Fantasy Girl, which releases this October.

How many books do you have under the proverbial bed? Will they ever see the light of day?

Sadly, the book I wrote while working as a volunteer in Zambia, The Best of Intentions, will never see the light of day, but it was my first. Neither will my second or third…

I tend to work through story ideas when I’m driving or in the shower, both of which are, of course, places I can’t write anything down. Do you have any strange writing habits?

I talk through plot problems with my mare, Gencianna, while I’m out riding, though strangely she never seems to offer advice in return. I can sometimes get so engrossed that I suddenly realize where I am, and it’s not where I intended to be.

Probably much safer to do that on a horse than in a car, which is what occasionally happens to me. Can we see a photo of your writing space?

This is my writing nook, where I write first drafts on my laptop (when I can nudge Grunt out of the way.)

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Aww. Grunt is adorable! Neat freak or not so much?

Not even vaguely!

I knew there was a reason we get along. Other than “butt in chair,” what piece of advice would you give to an aspiring author?

Write what you love—it’s the only thing that will keep you going when things get tough. Which they will.

Very good advice! Thanks so much for stopping by, Nina! Here’s more about Nina’s latest release:

One kisTHE-SPANIARD'S-KISS-1600x2400s will change their friendship forever…

Widow Isobel Sinclair knows it’s time to move on, and she believes the next chapter in her life involves a baby. All she needs is a man to help her with the finer details. Unfortunately, right now the only man in her life is her husband’s best friend, Rafael Sanchez. And an incredibly wealthy, super-hot player is not exactly family material.

That’s okay since she wants a baby sans the husband part.

Billionaire playboy Rafael has carefully hidden his longing for Isobel over the years. He’s wanted her from the moment they met. When desire sparks between them, Rafael faces a choice beyond imagining: give Isobel what she wants…or lose her forever. He has a good reason why a child can’t be in his future, but telling Isobel the truth could destroy everything.

Excerpt:

A dull ache throbbed behind his eyes, no doubt caused by lack of sleep and exacerbated by the onset of insanity. That was all it could be—Isobel Sinclair was driving him mad. It was two days since she’d made her preposterous proposition, and he hadn’t felt entirely sane since.

Every time he turned around she was there—talking to some man. He hadn’t realized there were so many men about, tall ones, short ones, fat ones, thin ones. Their appearance didn’t seem to matter to Bella. Perhaps he should give her a little lesson in genetics, point out that she should be a bit more discerning if she was looking for someone to father her children.

Available on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B0105VHBCS

Find Nina on Social Media:

Author Website: http://www.ninacroft.com/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/Nina_Croft
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/NinaCroft.Writer
Newsletter: http://eepurl.com/rZ5rz

 

Five Reasons to Go to a Writers’ Conference

I spent this weekend at my RWA chapter’s Cleveland Rocks Romance Conference, which was wonderful. So wonderful, in fact, I thought I’d share with you some reasons why, if you’re a writer, you should attend a writers’ conference too.

1. You meet other writers.

Writing is a solitary occupation. We spend a lot of time in our own heads, which is generally a wonderful place to be, but it does us all good to get out of there for a while and meet like-minded people. We can learn from each other’s experiences, kick ideas around, make new friends, and laugh a lot.

2. You learn some new things.

Conferences include workshops about various aspects of the writing business. Our conference, for example, included an editor/agent panel on what’s hot in romance and tips on writing an attention-grabbing first page, as well as workshops on Disorganized Organized Revisions by Hanna Martine, Using Social Media by Mindy McGinnis, and Romantic Suspense by Carla Neggers.

3. You get to hobnob with famous and not-yet-so-famous authors.

A not-so-famous author pic I shamelessly stole from Miranda Liasson

Conferences usually include at least one best-selling super-famous author who gives a keynote speech and/or teaches a workshop–our keynote speaker this year was Carla Neggers. You can meet them and talk to them. They will happily autograph a book for you, and have their picture taken with you. The not-yet-so-famous authors will eagerly do the same, mostly because we are so happy anyone is paying attention to us at all.

<— A not-yet-so-famous author pic I shamelessly stole from Miranda Liasson

4. You can sometimes relax and kick back with editors and agents.

Our conference includes a gathering in the hotel bar after the Friday evening panel. Editors and agents are not scary at all when they’ve had a couple of drinks. Although one does have to be careful not to drink more than they do, because that can get embarrassing. Or so I’ve heard…

5. You have an opportunity to pitch your books to those agents and editors, face to face.

Although the prospect is really quite terrifying for introverted writers (especially me, as I haven’t done it yet), people tell me it’s not so bad. The advantage is that you have an editor or agent’s rapt attention for 5-10 minutes to tell them what your book is about. They can ask questions about it and other things you’ve written, an opportunity not provided by a written query.

Bonus reason: Books!!

But peIMG_2587rhaps one of the best reasons to attend a writers’ conference is the books. Some free, some not so free, some autographed, some not. Conferences are an excellent way to remind ourselves why we got into this crazy writing business in the first place–because we love books.

This year’s haul —>

Author Interview: Christy McKee

Today fellow Ohio girl and NEORWA chapter-mate, Christy McKee, sits on the hot seat. Christy’s latest book, The Truth About Lilly, was released on Valentine’s Day. Welcome, Christy!

Tell us a bit about you. Where do you live, and how long have you been writing?

Thank you so much for having me today.  For starters, I am a Buckeye, born and raised in Ohio. When I married, my husband’s career took us to Georgia, South Carolina, Kentucky and Louisiana, but my heart never left the Midwest. Finally, we have come home to stay and live in a picturesque little Ohio town with a lovely square and Victorian gazebo.  I worked in TV and advertising for many years, always doing some kind of writing but never fiction.  I heard about a Romantic Times convention and talked myself into going. A year later, my first book was completed.  The line I submitted to was done away with and my book collected dust for the next several years.

What inspired you to write The Truth About Lilly?

My early childhood was spent at a resort area, Indian Lake, in Ohio. My dad owned a marina and boat sales/repair operation. Growing up in a place where people vacation and are there to have a good time was fun. We always had a supply of new friends and many who came back year after year. I thought it would be interesting to build a series around a similar resort town, my fictional Haley, Vermont.

Sounds like a wonderful place to grow up! What does your writing process look like? 

My writing process is sort of a hybrid. I am not a pure panster but I stop at story boards. When a story idea comes to me it appears in Technicolor in video format.  I have the beginning and end but no middle. The real work comes in deciding on the plot points, creating the middle.  After I’ve decided how the characters need to grow, I am set to begin writing. I maintain if I plotted the book out in its entirety, all the fun of discovery would be gone. And… I’m all about having fun on the job.

What do you do when you’re not writing?

When I am not writing, I read, go to movies, go to Green Bay Packers games, watch Netflix series, PBS, research house plans for the perfect house I want to build someday and visit my children.

What are you working on now?

At the moment I am writing book two in The Shores of Lake Champlain series. It’s about a thriller writer who has withdrawn from life after losing his wife and child and the personal chef who is determined to force him to start living again.

What book are you reading now?

I love the Emily March series Eternity Springs and am reading book nine, Tear Drop Lane.

I tend to work through story ideas when I’m driving or in the shower, both of which are, of course, places I can’t write anything down. Do you have any strange writing habits?

Here I thought I was the only one who wrote in the shower. For some reason, after lathering and rinsing, I crank up the water temperature and go into a “mellow thought” zone.  Plot problems I’ve fiddled around with suddenly have a solution. I am not being kind to the environment, I know—all that hot water– but for some reason it works. I keep expecting my mother to show up—in ghost form– and knock on the bathroom door telling me I am using up all the hot water.  As for driving and writing, don’t get me started. I’ve gone to the grocery for milk and ended up God knows where—truly I didn’t know where– while ruminating over a new scene for my book. The things we go through for our art.

Oh my. I don’t tend to get lost, but I have sometimes been surprised to arrive at my destination without being completely aware of getting there.  That’s probably a bad thing to admit, isn’t it?

The Truth About Lilly, by Christy McKeechristylillysmall190x303 (1)

Disgraced…

Lilly Talbot never imagined she would be starting her life over again.  Losing her good name for something she didn’t do has driven her to move into an old lake house she inherited in Vermont. Upon arrival, she is stunned to see half the roof is about to slide into Lake Champlain. Even more upsetting, the man who can fix it will only agree if she trades him room and board for his labor. What will the good people of Haley think of her sharing a house with the handsome bachelor?

A man with a past…

Connor “Mac” McQueen, once one of the infamous Whiz Kids of Wall Street, spent three years in prison for insider trading. Only one thing sustained him during his time inside, the thought of owning Point Cottage, a home he’d fallen in love with years ago. His plans to turn the house into a stunning showcase for his eco-friendly home construction business might be scrapped.

Secrets and lies…

Now someone’s trying to drive Lilly from her home. Is it someone from her past?  Mac has secrets of his own– that could ruin lives if revealed. But if Lilly and Mac are to have a future together they must first delve into the past for answers and accept some difficult truths about each other. Only then, will they know if true love is in their hearts.

Excerpt: 

   “Last week I had a blue Mercedes soft top.” She didn’t elaborate that it was a leased car, and she could neither afford to buy or lease another one. “If vandals had done this to that car, your sheriff would have found the culprits strung up by their toes in some of those big ole’ trees in the front yard.”
   “Blood thirsty little thing, aren’t you?” He offered up a rusty chuckle, relieved at her lift in spirits.
   “You know us Southerners. We still have our backs up over the War of Northern Aggression.”

Find Christy and her books at:
Website:    www.christymckee.com
Email:         cjwriter@zoominternet.net
Twitter:      https://twitter.com/ChristyMcKee
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/christymckee.author?ref=hl

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